Published: 2021-06-03 10:47 | Updated: 2021-06-03 10:57

Research sets light on the role of nitric oxide in the regulation of renal function

An article in Nature Reviews Nephrology summarizes the significant role of nitric oxide in the regulation of renal function and the link to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Mattias Carlström, Associate Professor of Physiology at KI, is the author behind the article.

Portrait photo of Mattias Carlström.
Mattias Carlström. Photo: Privat.

Nitric oxide is a short- lived and important signalling molecule in the body. The discovery of the importance of this molecule for the regulation of cardiovascular function was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1998 (Furchgott, Ignarro & Murad). Since then, a lot of research has been made and today it is well established that nitric oxide deficiency is associated with various diseases. The review article, summarizes bioactive nitrogen species, including nitric oxide’s, significant role in regulating kidney function and the link to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Underlying mechanisms for disease development and potentially new treatment strategies (i.e. dietary and pharmacological) to restore nitric oxide bioactivity, are discussed.

“Our research focuses on the link between cardiovascular disease, kidney failure and diabetes, with focus on underlying mechanisms and new potential therapeutic strategies”, says Mattias Carlström, Associate Professor of Physiology and group leader for Reactive oxygen radicals and nitric oxide in kidney and cardiovascular research at the Department of physiology and pharmacology.

“To publish a review article in the current area, in Nature Reviews, with a focus on nitric oxide, means a lot. Hopefully the interest for our research and the knowledge regarding the importance of nitric oxide is further increased and that it also leads to new and exciting preclinical and clinical studies in this area”, Mattias Carlström concludes.

 

Link to the article in Nature Reviews

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Mattias Carlström Researcher