Event type
Conferences and symposiums
Online workshop on sustainable developement - Stockholm-Tokyo University Partnership

27-09-2021 to
28-09-2021 Add to iCal
Online
Lead

Karolinska Institutet, KTH the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, The Stockholm Trio and the University of Tokyo welcomes you to join the fourth interdisciplinary workshop within the framework of the strategic partnership between the University of Tokyo and the Stockholm Trio.

Content

Academics in the filed of neuroscience, biomaterials, education as well as sustainable development will share research findings and discuss possibilities for collaboration.

The workshops targets students, doctoral students and researchers in different discipline and all sessions will be online. Please join the workshop and expand your network within the Stockholm Trio and the Univeristy of Tokyo.

Welcome to two half days 08.00-12.00 CET (or in Tokyo 15.00-19.00 JST). More information about the registration, programme and speakers can be found here (the programme and the speakers are continuously updated).

Contact

Published: 2021-09-17 11:07 | Updated: 2021-09-17 11:08

New center to promote sustainable health

Screen with zoom call with people from Makerere University.
The inauguration of Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Health (CESH) den 16 september 2021. Photo: Ulf Sirborn

On Thursday 16 September the Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Health (CESH) was inaugurated. It's a digital competence center that has been established together with Makerere University in Uganda. The purpose of the center is to promote sustainable health and contribute to Agenda 2030 with the help of a long-term partnership.

Screen with zoom call with people from Makerere University.
Foto: Ulf Sirborn

Already in January this year, Karolinska Institutet and Makerere University signed a collaboration agreement on the establishment of the center, and yesterday the inauguration took place digitally. The collaboration between the universities has been going on for over 20 years.

"This new centre is inspired by the ambitions of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals that aims to improve health and wellbeing for all, across geographical and generational boundaries and socioeconomic strata. COVID-19 has unveiled the sad consequences of health inequities. Most notably, poor countries lag far behind the rich in terms of access to vaccines and other opportunities to effectively and humanely counter the spread of infection," says President Ole Petter Ottersen.

During the inauguration the following topics were discussed:

  • the opportunities and challenges of sustainable health
  • why the center has been created and what the objectives are
  • how partnerships and universities can contribute to sustainable health

The inauguration was moderated by SVT's climate correspondent Erika Bjerström and Roy Mayega, senior lecturer at Makerere University (School of Public Health at the College of Health Sciences). Speakers from Karolinska Institutet were President Ole Petter Ottersen, Tobias Alfvén and Giulia Gaudenzi, both at the Department of Global Public Health.

Published: 2021-09-15 14:57 | Updated: 2021-09-21 13:29

KI Biobank about flexible working -advice and lessons learned

We asked three managers at KI Biobank about the main lessons they take away from last year.

Mark Divers, Head of Office; James Thompson, Head of Unit Biobanken Lab; Sanela Kjellqvist, Head of Unit Kund & IT

What are your key learnings from the pandemic concerning collaboration, leadership and remote working?

Mark:

Wow! We can make it work. It wasn’t the working life disaster we feared. Everybody pulled together to make it work. Getting the delicate balance right for remote leadership was trick, but a worthwhile experience. The HR webinars on this were very helpful (the ones Matilda D organized with Habitude). I learnt a lot from listening to other managers’ insights.

Sanela:

Collaboration and leadership have different challenges when working remote. It is much easier to miss information for everyone. Therefore it is crucial not to jump into conclusions, but ask and check facts. Important from leadership perspective to work strategically with unity and remind everyone about the point above. It is also even more important to be clear in our communication as leaders.

James:

I have been working onsite throughout the pandemic. The lab team was divided into two groups that were alternating between working on site for a week and working remotely for a week. The idea being that if one team caught Covid, the other team would be able to keep the lab operations going. The biggest impact that this had was that lab staff frequently met physically and had lunch and coffee breaks together so avoided the isolation that many fully remote staff across the KI have reported.

How do you plan and prepare to adjust to a post pandemic working environment and working routines and to make use of your learnings from the pandemic?

Mark:

Cautious return to the work-place. We just discussed this at a department meeting. I want to involve the staff as much as possible in how we do that step-wise. Great that KI is giving us a framework for flexible working. We’ll need to upgrade meeting rooms for better av quality to enable hybrid meetings. My dream is that all staff will be motivated by having a bit more freedom in how they do their work.

Sanela:

It is important to involve all team members in planning return to office. Listen to everyone’s views and questions. We also need good equipment in order to make hybrid meetings as smooth as possible.

James:

As we get back to normal, the lab group will return onsite, however, some project work may give the opportunity to work remotely from time to time which I think staff will appreciate.

What are your experience and thoughts on hybrid meetings?

Mark:

I believe we need to improve the audiovisual technology to ensure that those participating remotely are not at a disadvantage. This also need more active chairing so that everyone’s voice is heard. We have to try it and see whether we can make it work.

Sanela:

Hybrid meetings work well but are dependent on good technical equipment.

James:

Not everything has to be decided at the same meeting. Big discussions can be spread over a couple of meetings and not everything needs to be decided then and there.

Tips and advises you would like to share?

Be open-minded for the new possibilities and solutions; share experience with others!

Published: 2021-09-13 15:05 | Updated: 2021-09-15 15:24

Hello there, Head of administration and Head of HR at the Department of Dental Medicine!

We asked the head of administration and the head of HR at the Department of Dental medicine about the opportunities and challenges they see with a flexible working approach.

Åsa Diberius, administrativ chef Institutionen för Odontologi

Åsa Diberius, Head of administration, Department of Dental medicine

What are the key lessons from the pandemic in terms of leadership and working practices?

- The fact that we have been able to adapt as well as we have done during the pandemic and embrace new ways of working shows our flexibility, responsiveness and ability to evolve. Fortunately, many tools were already in place before the pandemic, but we needed to ensure that the technological tools were available to everyone and that we raised our competence in these digital tools.

- During the pandemic, we had to challenge and develop our leadership, to really adapt our leadership to the situation. The lessons learned are that we need to work more on the conditions that create a trust-based organisation, to maintain and strengthen internal communication, and to ensure that we have the necessary support structures based on new ways of working.

What does the possibility of a flexible approach mean for you as an institution?

- That we can maintain and strengthen our employer brand in an increasingly competitive environment, making us an attractive employer that offers personalised opportunities.  

- The need for smart tools to communicate and collaborate is increasing and creating a user experience is becoming important.

What risks and opportunities do you see as a manager and leader? What do your employees say?

- During the pandemic, we had to adjust quickly, and there is an obvious risk in that we have managed despite the structures rather than because of them. We need to ensure that we have supportive structures that allow us to behave in new sustainable ways in a long term perspective.

- For many of our employees, the pandemic has not affected their physical presence in the workplace in terms of flexible working. At University Dental Clinic we have clinical activities that do not offer the same opportunities for flexible working. It has also meant that several of our operational support staff have been physically present at work on a continuous basis. The employees who have had the opportunity to work more flexibly are positive and think that it has worked very well. On the other hand, they miss their colleagues and view the physical and social distance negatively and express the need for better digital system support.

Jörgen Johansson, Head of HR, Department of Dental medicine

Jörgen Johansson, Head of HR, Department of Dental medicine

What does the possibility of a flexible way of working mean for the HR function??

- Many of our "competitors" for skilled workers in a hot labour market will draw their own conclusions from the experience of the pandemic. I think many of them will end up with a similar solution. I see a flexible working approach as a natural part of keeping our employer offer current and attractive.

Risks and concerns?

- In my experience, about 15% of a workforce works too much and about the same number works too little. However, the vast majority have a reasonable work-life balance. I believe that the vast majority fit very well into a flexible working approach. For about a third of the staff, however, there is a latent risk - I think.

-The advantage is that with present leadership, we know which people in the workgroup are our risk groups. It tends to be almost always the same people as before the pandemic - when we still expected staff to be in the office "all the time".

- The lack of present leadership, and I don't mean in the room, is a risk factor. The absence of fixed procedures for communication within the team is also a risk factor, as is the absence of objectives and their follow-up. However, these risk factors are the same with or without a flexible working approach. The difference is that the risks mentioned above risk going under the radar for a longer period of time.

- At an administrative level, we see a clear risk with a regulatory framework open to interpretation. Here we would like to see clarity. For example, we will find it difficult to move office equipment across town to our employees. Flexible working should be an option, not a right. If, for whatever reason, you are unable to work elsewhere than in the office, you are always welcome to come to the office. Nor are we interested in practising our employer responsibility on health and safety issues in each other's homes if the regulations force us to carry out physical health and safety surveys in the home environment. But this risk I believe the later versions of the regulations address.

How do you prepare?

- In a different ways. We brought a representative (Maria Deckeman) for a flexible working approach to our management group to have the opportunity to ask questions and get answers. During the pandemic, we have stressed the need to build stable procedures to counteract the risks I mentioned in the previous question and feel that we have a reasonably good structure and preparation to get started with a flexible way of working.

Do you have any tips for local HR in other departments?

- The introduction of flexible working is an active action. There is a big difference in approach and activity between demonstrated trust and a 'let go' attitude. The latter is directly inappropriate when introducing a flexible working method, perhaps even in most cases...

  • Trust is not the same as blind faith!
  • Create a present leadership
  • Find clear routines for communication within and between teams
  • Be clear about objectives and, above all, their follow-up
  • Don't forget the "coffee chats" at your Zoom/Team meetings, they fill a universal need for belonging
Published: 2021-09-13 14:11 | Updated: 2021-09-13 14:11

Hello there, Stina Jaensson!

Hello there, Stina Jaensson, Environmental Coordinator at KI!

Foto: Privat

How do you view the transformation that has taken place over the past year?

- The biggest change for me has been not taking the bike or the tube to work every day, but having the office at home. We have learned that travelling is not a matter of course and that, in many cases, it has worked very well to take the meeting at the kitchen table and participate in a conference from the couch.

What knowledge and experience can we take with us?

- We now have a huge opportunity to build on what we have learned during the pandemic and build a better society for the future. Flexible working can contribute to sustainable development, including by reducing travel to and from work and thus improving work-life balance. Reducing travel, both business travel and travel to and from work, would bring major benefits to society in terms of reduced carbon footprint, cleaner air and improved health. Time spent travelling to and from work can instead promote health and well-being, through increased opportunities for recovery and physical activity.. Virtual meetings can also promote gender equality and participation on a more equal footing.

- It has also become clear that we can share resources in the form of workplaces to a greater extent when we work part of our time at home. In this way, we save on premises, equipment and energy, which is good for the environment, the climate and the economy.

- Reducing emissions from our travel, reducing our energy use and conserving resources are also part of the climate strategy that KI decided on last spring. Together, we at KI can contribute to a more sustainable society.

We now have a huge opportunity to build on what we have learned during the pandemic and build a better society for the future

Stina Jaensson, Environmental coordinator at Karolinska Institutet

Published: 2021-09-13 12:58 | Updated: 2021-09-13 14:15

Insights, challenges and opportunities

Portrait of Anders Gustafsson

Vice President Anders Gustafsson shares his thoughts on leadership and working methods based on lessons learned from the pandemic.

We have lived with this pandemic for a year and a half now. Looking ahead to some kind of “a new normal”, what opportunities and risks do you see with a flexible way of working? 

- Of course, we need to make use of what we have all learned during the pandemic, where some things have worked well and others less well. For instance, time savings due to reduced travel to various meetings, both internal and external, is an obviously good thing. At the same time, opportunities to interact are missed. Working only remotely can have a negative impact on creativity and spontaneity. 

- The meetings we have every other Tuesday with KI´s clinical heads, deans, committee chair (about 25 people) have been conducted digitally for almost 1,5 years. This fall, every other meeting will be physical and every other digital. I think that will be a good mix. 

- I am also head of the disciplinary committee, and that works really well remotely, which we will continue with. 

As vice president, you have a special responsibility for the cooperation with Region Stockholm. How has this been affected during the pandemic? 

- The pandemic has required intense and effective cooperation with Region Stockholm, when it comes to education as well as research. Our joint efforts to install locations for on-site training (VFU) despite the high strain on healthcare is impressive. An example from last summer is when we had to find a large amount of new on-site training locations for medical students. 

- When it comes to research, the cooperation has resulted in a large number of covid-related projects. One example is the vaccine project, headed by Hans-Gustaf Ljunggren. 

Do you have any takeaways for KI’s employees and managers when it comes to the re-opening of campus and the physical workplace and the possibility of a flexible way of working? 

- It can't be an either-or situation. An assessment on a case-by-case basis must be made. I think that it is important that it should be determined by the objective and activities not by individual employees. 

What are your greatest lessons regarding your own leadership and way of working during the pandemic? 

-That it takes an assessment in each individual case. Many meetings work well remotely, but I will appreciate the opportunity to have some meetings IRL. 

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
Online workshop on sustainable developement - Stockholm-Tokyo University Partnership

27-09-2021 to
28-09-2021 Add to iCal
Online
Lead

Karolinska Institutet, KTH the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, The Stockholm Trio and the University of Tokyo welcomes you to join the fourth interdisciplinary workshop within the framework of the strategic partnership between the University of Tokyo and the Stockholm Trio.

Content

Academics in the filed of neuroscience, biomaterials, education as well as sustainable development will share research findings and discuss possibilities for collaboration.

The workshops targets students, doctoral students and researchers in different discipline and all sessions will be online. Please join the workshop and expand your network within the Stockholm Trio and the Univeristy of Tokyo.

Welcome to two half days 08.00-12.00 CET (or in Tokyo 15.00-19.00 JST). More information about the registration, programme and speakers can be found here (the programme and the speakers are continuously updated).

Contact

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
Health Equity and Pandemics – a Moonshot for Sustainable Health

06-10-2021 11:00 am - 1:30 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
(CEST) Online from Campus Solna, Sweden. https://ki-se.zoom.us/j/6223475 8753
Globe
Photo: Getty Images
Lead

Are you interested in knowing more about what it will take to prevent pandemics and reach sustainable health for all, globally? What can we learn from the pandemic and climate experiences to propel humanity towards sustainable health for people as well as the planet?

The World Health Organization (WHO) and Karolinska Institutet (KI) proudly invite to the first annual joint Rosling seminar.

Content
11:00
Welcome

Prof. Ole Petter Ottersen, President Karolinska Institutet

-
State of the SDG:s, Gapminder update

Mr. Ola Rosling, President Gapminder

-
Opening conversation

Overall theme: What can we learn from the pandemic and climate experiences to propel humanity towards sustainable health for people as well as planet?

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General WHO & Prof. Ole Petter Ottersen, led by Prof. Stefan Swartling Peterson.

-
Governing health innovation for the common good: a mission oriented approach

Prof. Mariana Mazzucato, University College London (UCL)

-
What Hans Taught Me about Global Public Health – and beating COVID-19

Ms. Melinda French Gates

-
Break
13:30
Conclusions and end of seminar

Prof. Ole Petter Ottersen, President Karolinska Institutet

    The seminar is moderated by Prof. Stefan Swartling Peterson, Karolinska Institutet and will be held on Zoom:

    The link to the seminar will be open from 10.50 am. Please join in time.

    To join the Webinar we recommend that you use the Zoom Client. If you are not able to join the Webinar using the Zoom Client you can join using one of the following web browsers: Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Safari.

    No registration to the seminar is needed.

    Moonshot – used to refer to a plan or aim to do something that seems almost impossible, or relating to such plans or aims (def Cambridge Dictionary)

    Event type
    Lectures and seminars
    Climate psychology - how to act in the climate crisis and tackle climate anxiety

    31-08-2021 2:00 pm - 2:45 pm Add to iCal
    Online
    Lead

    KI Council for Environment and Sustainable Development invites you to an open seminar with psychologist Frida Hylander about climate crisis, climate anxiety and ability to take action for a sustainable change.

    Content
    Photo: Karin Boo

    Why don’t we do more in the current climate crisis? How can we change? How can we tackle climate anxiety? With the basis on knowledge of human behaviour and ability to cooperate, psychologist Frida Hylander gives in this lecture an action plan for a more sustainable and effective climate work as well as tools for how to handle feelings of frustration and anxiety on a personal level. 

    Link to Zoom webinar

    Event type
    Social activity
    Tennis Lessons in Solna

    08-09-2021 11:00 am - 1:00 pm Add to iCal
    Campus Solna
    Location
    Grantis väg 6
    Lead

    During four Wednesdays in September, we offer tennis lessons at Campus Solna.

    Content
    Tennistränare Keithroy O. Grant Foto: Keithroy O. Grant

    Levels

    Beginners

    • Never played or have played a bit
    • Never taken a tennis lesson
    • Main focus: technique training

    Advanced

    • Played for a while
    • Played tennis games
    • Main focus: improving skills

    Date

    8, 15, 22 or 29th of September

    4 participants/lesson. In the event of fully booked classes, you will be restricted to 1 lesson per person. 

    Time

    11:00 - 12:00 Beginners

    12:00 - 13:00 Advanced

    Location

    Tennis courts on Campus Solna. Granits väg 6. 

    Price

    375 SEK per person/hour. Pay with Swish after the lesson.

    Sign up - September 3 at the latest

    Send a mail to: keithroygrant@gmail.com 

    Instructor Keithroy O. Grant has been coaching tennis for 20 and believes everyone can learn to play and develop their skills. 
     

    ””If you can move, you can play. Let me teach you everything the other trainers forgot to cover”. 

    Keithroy O. Grant, tennis instructor

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