Event type
Other
Internship program by KI Career Service - Project presentations Autumn 2021

11-10-2021 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
Zoom
Lead

PhD student, Postdoc or early career researcher interested in an internship in an organization or company outside of academia? KI Career Service has recruited about 40 different internship projects for the Autumn 2021 call

Content

In these webinar sessions, covering the afternoons of Mon Oct 11th to Fri Oct 15th, representatives of the different organizations offering internships will take turns pitching their projects and answering all your internship related questions. Register for the event series once and attend as many presentations as you like throughout the week. 

The sessions will not be recorded.

We aim at having the organizations presenting projects like this:

Day 1: Oct 11,  Presentation from organizations offering internships to PhD students only

Day 2-3: Oct 12-13, Presentation from organizations offering internships to PhD students and internships to Postdocs/Early Career researchers

Day 4-5: Oct 14-15, Presentation from organizations offering internships to Postdocs/Early Career researchers only

The presentations are primarily targeted to PhD students, postdoc and early career researcher who are thinking of applying for the internships, but everyone is welcome to attend and just get some inspiration. The length of internship project are 1 month for PhD students and up to 3 months for Postdocs and Early career researchers.

Check the projects on the applicable pages below
(including project descriptions, eligibility criteria and application process)

Postdoc and early career researcher internships

PhD students internships

Participating companies and organizations

  • Affibody
  • Arkus AI
  • Aurora dynamics
  • BioArctic AB
  • Biomedrex
  • BOOST Thyroid
  • CHIESI PHARMA AB
  • CombiGene
  • Ebba Biotech
  • Forska!Sverige
  • IQVIA
  • Lumell
  • Nordea
  • Ovulai
  • Parexel 
  • Pfizer
  • Pharmacolog AB 
  • Radioscience
  • Randstad
  • Schain Research
  • Sigrid Therapeutics AB
  • SIS
  • Sprint Bioscience
  • Tobii Pro
  • VA
  • VR

Presenting Schedule

(schedule coming when available)

All organizations will present a 10 min pitch and have 5min for Q&A.

Target group 

Postdocs and early career researchers at KI interested in internships 

PhD students enrolled in the doctoral course Career Skills for Scientist.

Other KI staff interested to learn about the participating companies and organizations.

Organizers 

This event is organized by KI Career Service in collaboration with our internship partners.

Registration 

Please use your @ki.se email when signing up

Registration LINK to ZOOM Meeting  

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
BYRS 2021: 5th Biomedicum-BioClinicum Young Researchers Symposium

09-11-2021 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Add to iCal
Campus Solna
Location
Eva & Georg Klein lecture hall, Biomedicum, Solnavägen 9, and online via Zoom
Lead

Welcome to BYRS 2021, the 5th Biomedicum-BioClinicum Young Researchers Symposium! The aim of the symposium is to enhance collaborations between researchers within Biomedicum & BioClinicum. It provides an opportunity for young researchers to present their research, form new connections and therefore build a community. BYRS 2021 will be held in auditorium Eva & Georg Klein at Biomedicum, and broadcasted simultaneously via Zoom.

Content

Target group

Young researchers at KI, including master students, PhDs and post-doctoral researchers

Registration

Register via link: https://survey.ki.se/BYRS2021

Organizers

This event is organized by Karolinska Institutet Clinicum Connection (KICC), in collaboration with the CBG Doctoral Programme.

Contact

Published: 2021-09-24 11:19 | Updated: 2021-09-24 13:16

AI in focus at this year's KI-Mayo Clinic conference

Recently, the 27th Annual Research Meeting was held within the collaboration between Karolinska Institutet and Mayo Clinic.

As in 2020, the confernece was held online over two half-days and this year it gathered over 700 registered  participants  within 11 different  break out sessions. Both days ended with a joint lecture. This year, the focus was on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and precision medicine, areas that already have brought major changes to the field of health care and, according to the keynote speakers, we cannot even imagine the changes that lay ahead.

Eric E Schmidt
Eric E Schmidt Foto: Wikipedia

AI is a tool in the future of health care

Eric Schmidt, co-founder of Schmidt Futures and former CEO and chairman of Google, ended the first day. He talked about how artificial intelligence can impact health care. Data processing of large amounts of data can provide sub-methods for decision making and change methods and treatments.

The pandemic has really provided evidence of how we with combined forces and large amounts of data, can reduce the time to develop treatment, test methods and get new results for future research.

AI will not destroy us

When asked if AI will destroy the human race, Eric replied that there will be no robots that take over and become evil, but we do not yet understand and cannot predict how to coexist with non-human intelligence. It iss yet to be seen. Challenges such as ethics, fairness and bias, will remain as long as the data is biased. The more data collected from different areas and groups, the better AI, but it will never be perfect.  Future health service  will need people who are "bilingual", i.e. understand both technology and medicine. AI will not take over the work and all decision-making, but it will be an important tool in health care.

Porträtt av Anna Martling
Anna Martling. Fotograf: Samuel Unéus. Foto: Samuel Unéus

Precision medicine is AI in practice

Anna Martling, Professor of Surgery and Dean of KI Campus Nord completed the second and final day of the conference. Like Eric Schmidt, she showed how the development of handling large amounts of data has resulted in better and more personalized care. Through a patient case, she showed how the 1990s view on lung cancer and treatment evolved step by step, mainly through the mapping of the human genome that has led to a paradigm shift.

We need to raise awarness

Personalized care, so-called precision medicine, can bridge the gap between health care, research, and innovation. As Eric, Anna sees challenges for healthcare to embrace technology and change the organization. A discussion is needed to raise awareness about the area.

A new center for precision medicine

Anna presented the new center for precision medicine, the Precision Medicine Centre (PMCK), a collaboration between Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital, which takes on a coordinating role in the ecosystem of healthcare, industry, and academia. This ecosystem includes the Datadriven Life Science system (DDLS),  a programme consisting of 11 partners, which is part of SciLifeLab's  operations. Anna sees great opportunities to collaborate internationally in the field and welcomes the Mayo Clinic to join.

Welcome to Stockholm 2022

Jan Anderson, representative of the collaboration's steering group, concluded the conference by highlighting several of the values that unite Karolinska Institutet and Mayo Clinic, such as respect, teamwork and justice, and welcomed everyone to a physical conference in Stockholm in 2022. There, the discussion on the future of health care can continue.

Contact

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
Online workshop on sustainable developement - Stockholm-Tokyo University Partnership

27-09-2021 to
28-09-2021 Add to iCal
Online
Lead

Karolinska Institutet, KTH the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, The Stockholm Trio and the University of Tokyo welcomes you to join the fourth interdisciplinary workshop within the framework of the strategic partnership between the University of Tokyo and the Stockholm Trio.

Content

Academics in the filed of neuroscience, biomaterials, education as well as sustainable development will share research findings and discuss possibilities for collaboration.

The workshops targets students, doctoral students and researchers in different discipline and all sessions will be online. Please join the workshop and expand your network within the Stockholm Trio and the Univeristy of Tokyo.

Welcome to two half days 08.00-12.00 CET (or in Tokyo 15.00-19.00 JST). More information about the registration, programme and speakers can be found here (the programme and the speakers are continuously updated).

Contact

Published: 2021-09-17 11:07 | Updated: 2021-09-17 11:08

New center to promote sustainable health

Screen with zoom call with people from Makerere University.
The inauguration of Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Health (CESH) den 16 september 2021. Photo: Ulf Sirborn

On Thursday 16 September the Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Health (CESH) was inaugurated. It's a digital competence center that has been established together with Makerere University in Uganda. The purpose of the center is to promote sustainable health and contribute to Agenda 2030 with the help of a long-term partnership.

Screen with zoom call with people from Makerere University.
Foto: Ulf Sirborn

Already in January this year, Karolinska Institutet and Makerere University signed a collaboration agreement on the establishment of the center, and yesterday the inauguration took place digitally. The collaboration between the universities has been going on for over 20 years.

"This new centre is inspired by the ambitions of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals that aims to improve health and wellbeing for all, across geographical and generational boundaries and socioeconomic strata. COVID-19 has unveiled the sad consequences of health inequities. Most notably, poor countries lag far behind the rich in terms of access to vaccines and other opportunities to effectively and humanely counter the spread of infection," says President Ole Petter Ottersen.

During the inauguration the following topics were discussed:

  • the opportunities and challenges of sustainable health
  • why the center has been created and what the objectives are
  • how partnerships and universities can contribute to sustainable health

The inauguration was moderated by SVT's climate correspondent Erika Bjerström and Roy Mayega, senior lecturer at Makerere University (School of Public Health at the College of Health Sciences). Speakers from Karolinska Institutet were President Ole Petter Ottersen, Tobias Alfvén and Giulia Gaudenzi, both at the Department of Global Public Health.

Published: 2021-09-13 13:17 | Updated: 2021-09-13 13:17

Four questions to Head of HR-Office and Chair of Saco-S at KI

Mats Engelbrektson, Head of HR-Office, and Torkel Falkenberg, researcher and Chair of Saco-S, share their thoughts about flexible working.

Mats Engelbrektson och Torkel Falkenberg i digitalt möte Foto: Mats Engelbrektson

Why flexible working at KI?

Mats:

-  There are several reasons for doing so. In addition to preventing the spread of infection in the workplace and in society at large until such a need is no longer present, there are benefits to be gained from ensuring an attractive workplace, increased performance associated with flexible working arrangements for the individual and possibly also, in some cases, reduced cost of renting premises. Most other employers in Sweden and internationally will focus on more flexible ways of working.

Torkel:

-  We believe that flexibility and individualised solutions promote creativity and productivity. Through the pandemic, many employers have experienced how digitalisation and teleworking have created new creative environments to complement our usual ways of working. Going completely back to the old ways of working seems unthinkable and indeed a waste of all the innovation that our employees and managers have contributed to at the KI - something we must continue to capitalise on!

That said, we need to be careful about how we change, moving away from the idea of 'one size fits all' and instead using tailor-made solutions wherever possible. In the long term, we believe this will lead to a better sense of coherence, innovation and productivity, as well as make it easier for our employees of different ages to achieve a better work-life balance. Something that simply contributes to healthier and happier colleagues in our workplace - job satisfaction pure and simple.

Can everyone work at home?

Mats:

-  Only those who have jobs that are suitable for working at home should do so. But we believe that the majority of those with suitable work can work more flexibly and to some extent remotely. The home workplace must be satisfactory in terms of the working environment as well as the possibility of working undisturbed. Each individual must also be able to cope with the responsibility that flexible working entails. But most people seem to be able to do that, based on our experience during the pandemic.

Torkel:

-  Of course not. For many it is impossible, for example in laboratory or clinical work, and for many it is not even desirable for various other reasons. As people increasingly move their work away from the premises of the Agency, the employer must take more joint responsibility for the new situation. It is likely that what was impossible to do off-site in the past will become increasingly possible in the future. Innovation in this area is still in its infancy. We believe that the biggest challenge is the social working environment and how it can be sustained over time in an authentic way that feels meaningful to our employees. In other words, more desire-driven than coercive, but still effective and appreciated. This is a learning process between the organisation, managers and employees, developing together the workplace of tomorrow in relation to our overall Strategy 2030. In all transitions, it is important not to burn any bridges, but to ensure that we at KI also have excellent working environments on-site, and that our employees do not experience stress in decommissioning office environments, but that step by step this is made a collaborative process. Everyone should be involved in a way that is optimal for everyone, any other ambition is not compatible with KI's 2030 Strategy or core values as we see it.

How to introduce and apply flexible working?

Mats:

- Our local collaboration agreement (Sustainable Cooperation and Participation for the Future) is an excellent basis to stand on. As a manager, you have a dialogue with your employees about how the work could be structured and designed. Based on the dialogue, the manager can then decide what it should look like. It doesn't take extensive changes in leadership to implement a flexible approach to work and much of this is already learnt from 18 months of working at home during the pandemic.

Torkel:

- The challenge of a more flexible way of working for our managers should not be underestimated. Most managers are good at conventional management. Suddenly, qualities such as responsiveness, trust, intuition, and the ability to create the conditions for a new way of working through dialogue become even more important than before. Some managers will need help here in order to succeed. We will need to adapt our leadership training and even think about how we view our staff meetings when a much greater proportion of the work is done elsewhere, largely without direct supervision from the immediate manager. Managing remotely starts with genuine friendliness and trust, and the next step is to build the trusting partnership that provides the foundation necessary for effective and sustainable remote working. Fortunately, much of this trust-based collaboration focused on our employees and managers out in the organisation's capillaries is described in our local collaboration agreements. These agreements, as we see it, are the very foundation of the work at KI where flexible ways of working and other needs can be raised, problematised and developed in consultation within the framework of Strategy 2030. How fortunate that we started this collaborative work long before the pandemic so now we just need to implement this in the organisation, at central, departmental and group level.

What about wellness and collegiality?

Mats:

- We will encourage and support wellness. Teleworking requires the individual to take responsibility for implementing wellness activities and for taking breaks and rests. It is also important that those who call to digital meetings plan time for recovery before and after meetings, for example by deducting five minutes at the beginning and/or end of the meeting time so that the next meeting does not start immediately after. 

Torkel:

- Employer investment in health factors at KI is crucial for all employees. A public agency that values employee health and wellness, such as the best lunches, green spaces, a sense of belonging, inner sustainability or exercise, is a winner that understands how to prioritise costs because it pays off in the long run in every way. If KI is to remain a world leader, we must also be a world leader in this. In a more flexible future, all health factors need to reach employees wherever they are with their bodies and minds. It could be in Uganda, Västerås or Campus Flemingsberg. It doesn't matter. We protect our employees wherever they are as much as possible. When KI comes home to us in a respectful and consensual manner, we are safeguarding both collegiality and excellence, and moreover, it brings elements of Strategy 2030 to life in practice.

Published: 2021-09-08 15:40 | Updated: 2021-09-09 10:32

Precision medicine at the centre during German state visit

The German President, H.E. Frank-Walter Steinmeier and H.M. King Carl XVI Gustaf visits Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital.
The German President, H.E. Frank-Walter Steinmeier and H.M. King Carl XVI Gustaf visits Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital. Photo: Erik Flyg

On 8 September, the German President, H.E. Frank-Walter Steinmeier and H.M. King Carl XVI Gustaf visited Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital.

The themes of the president's three-day visit to Sweden were innovation, sustainability, and democracy. During the visit to Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska Hospital, the visitors were invited, among other things, to a lecture on precision medicine by Anna Martling, professor of surgery at the Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, chief physician and colorectal surgeon at Karolinska University Hospital.

Anna Martling having a speech in a lecture hall.
Anna Martling talking about precision medicin during the German state visit 8 September 2021. Photo: Erik Flyg

"With the serious introduction of precision medicine in healthcare, it is possible to provide the right treatment at the right time to each individual patient. It will reduce suffering and save lives," Martling says of the subject, specifically requested by the German delegation.

Precision Medical Centre Karolinska is a joint initiative from Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital that develops solutions for a sustainable, broad implementation of precision medicine in an academic healthcare environment.

Björn Zoëga, Hospital Director of Karolinska University Hospital, addressed the German delegation and King Carl XVI Gustaf about the recent task of caring for patients with COVID-19. Karolinska Institutet's President Ole Petter Ottersen also gave a speech, where the topic was knowledge building as a basis for working with difficult medical situations both now and in the future.

"Collaboration and good relationships are and always will be essential in science. Germany and Sweden have intensive research cooperation that has been very important, not least now during the pandemic. I look forward to this cooperation continuing in the future and that we, together with colleagues in other countries, can strengthen our preparedness for future pandemics," says Ole Petter Ottersen.

Lars I Eriksson, professor at the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and chief physician at Karolinska University Hospital, also participated.

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
Online workshop on sustainable developement - Stockholm-Tokyo University Partnership

27-09-2021 to
28-09-2021 Add to iCal
Online
Lead

Karolinska Institutet, KTH the Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, The Stockholm Trio and the University of Tokyo welcomes you to join the fourth interdisciplinary workshop within the framework of the strategic partnership between the University of Tokyo and the Stockholm Trio.

Content

Academics in the filed of neuroscience, biomaterials, education as well as sustainable development will share research findings and discuss possibilities for collaboration.

The workshops targets students, doctoral students and researchers in different discipline and all sessions will be online. Please join the workshop and expand your network within the Stockholm Trio and the Univeristy of Tokyo.

Welcome to two half days 08.00-12.00 CET (or in Tokyo 15.00-19.00 JST). More information about the registration, programme and speakers can be found here (the programme and the speakers are continuously updated).

Contact

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
Health Equity and Pandemics – a Moonshot for Sustainable Health

06-10-2021 11:00 am - 1:30 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
(CEST) Online from Campus Solna, Sweden. https://ki-se.zoom.us/j/6223475 8753
Globe
Photo: Getty Images
Lead

Are you interested in knowing more about what it will take to prevent pandemics and reach sustainable health for all, globally? What can we learn from the pandemic and climate experiences to propel humanity towards sustainable health for people as well as the planet?

The World Health Organization (WHO) and Karolinska Institutet (KI) proudly invite to the first annual joint Rosling seminar.

Content
11:00
Welcome

Prof. Ole Petter Ottersen, President Karolinska Institutet

-
State of the SDG:s, Gapminder update

Mr. Ola Rosling, President Gapminder

-
Opening conversation

Overall theme: What can we learn from the pandemic and climate experiences to propel humanity towards sustainable health for people as well as planet?

Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General WHO & Prof. Ole Petter Ottersen, led by Prof. Stefan Swartling Peterson.

-
Governing health innovation for the common good: a mission oriented approach

Prof. Mariana Mazzucato, University College London (UCL)

-
What Hans Taught Me about Global Public Health – and beating COVID-19

Ms. Melinda French Gates

-
Break
13:30
Conclusions and end of seminar

Prof. Ole Petter Ottersen, President Karolinska Institutet

    The seminar is moderated by Prof. Stefan Swartling Peterson, Karolinska Institutet and will be held on Zoom:

    The link to the seminar will be open from 10.50 am. Please join in time.

    To join the Webinar we recommend that you use the Zoom Client. If you are not able to join the Webinar using the Zoom Client you can join using one of the following web browsers: Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Safari.

    No registration to the seminar is needed.

    Moonshot – used to refer to a plan or aim to do something that seems almost impossible, or relating to such plans or aims (def Cambridge Dictionary)

    Published: 2021-09-01 11:38 | Updated: 2021-09-01 11:50

    Karolinska Institutet wants to help refugee researchers

    In collaboration with Scholars at Risk, KI is starting a fundraiser to Afghan researchers. Foto: Getty Images

    Due to the difficult situation in Afghanistan, Karolinska Institutet is now starting a fundraiser to provide Afghan researchers with the opportunity to conduct their research at KI. This is being done through a collaboration with the Scholars at Risk (SAR) network.

    The humanitarian situation in Afghanistan is acute and serious for many groups in the country. This is true in research and academia – and especially so for women. Many researchers are now forced to stop their work at home and flee abroad.

    Ole Petter Ottersen with his hands crossed in front of him and stairs in the background.
    Ole Petter Ottersen, President at Karolinska Institutet. Photo: Erik Flyg

    “What we are now seeing happening in Afghanistan is deeply tragic. We all have a responsibility to take action against a development in which researchers are silenced because they are persecuted, harassed, or threatened. As one of the world's leading medical universities, Karolinska Institutet is now launching a fundraiser together with the organization Scholars at Risk. Our goal is to be able to offer an Afghan researcher the opportunity to come to KI and thus be able to continue their research here. This is happening now at several higher education institutions around the world and I would urge all higher education institutions and universities to make efforts for academic freedom based on the situation in Afghanistan," says Ole Petter Ottersen, President of KI.  

    Together with Scholars at Risk, a fundraiser is now being started. The goal is to create the opportunity for an Afghan researcher to work at KI for two years.

    "In this way, we are showing that research and higher education cannot be stopped by terror and persecution. Together with others, we will show that academic freedom and the development of knowledge can continue to develop despite the actions of anti-democratic regimes," says Ole Petter Ottersen. 

    KI has been a member of the international network Scholars at Risk for several years, the organization works globally for academic freedom against harassment and threats to academia and researchers. KI and SAR have previously worked closely together in the effort to try to get the KI alumnus and researcher in disaster medicine, Ahmadreza Djalali, acquitted of the death sentence and released from the prison in Iran where he has been detained since 2016.

    Can you contribute? Then get in touch with Jenny Löhr or Anna Urban at the Development Office.

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