Event type
Lectures and seminars
What is life? & The future of biology: How does chemistry come alive? Energy and matter at the origin of life

16-06-2021 2:30 pm Add to iCal
Campus Solna
Location
Zoom meeting (see link below)
Lead

Speaker: Nick Lane, Professor of Evolutionary Biochemistry, University College London
Host: Ingemar Ernberg

Content

Zoom information

Direct link to the meeting on Zoom

Meeting ID: 698 8193 3045
Passcode: 803768

Or dial +46 850 539 728 Sweden, +46 8 4468 2488 Sweden

 

Nick Lane Biography
Nick Lane is an evolutionary biochemist and writer in the Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London. He was awarded the inaugural Provost's Venture Research Prize for his research on evolutionary biochemistry and bioenergetics in 2009. His work focuses on the origin of life, and the origin and evolution of eukaryotes. He was a founding member of the UCL Consortium for Mitochondrial Research, and is leading the UCL Research Frontiers Origins of Life programme. He is the author of four critically acclaimed books on evolutionary biochemistry. Life Ascending won the 2010 Royal Society Prize for Science Books, while The Vital Question was praised by Bill Gates as 'an amazing inquiry into the origins of life'. His work has been recognized by the Biochemical Society Award in 2015 and the Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize in 2016.

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Event type
Conferences and symposiums
John Lind Symposium: Making the Cultural Brain of the Child

23-09-2021 1:00 pm - 4:30 pm Add to iCal
Location
Nobel Forum, Solna Campus and digitally via Zoom
John Lind
John Lind Photo: Hugo Largerkranz
Lead

Lectures on the development of the brain connectome, maternal voice interaction, music in the neonatal ward, “singing kangaroo” and why books are better than screens.

A hybrid symposium with a limited number of participants in the lecture hall and with live streaming.

Content

Programme
Download the programme here (pdf)


Live streaming

Everyone can watch this symposium online on the link below free of charge, no registration required

Live streaming from Nobel forum on this link (active on 23rd September)

 

Registration for seats in Nobel Forum
A limited number of places at Nobel Forum are available on a first come first served basis

Register for the symposium at Nobel Forum here


Organisation
In collaboration with the Cultural Council of the Karolinska Institutet and Acta Paediatrica

Contact

Event type
Conferences and symposiums
The Neurobiology of Hatred

24-09-2021 9:30 am - 4:30 pm Add to iCal
Campus Solna
Location
Nobel Forum, Solna Campus and digitally via Zoom
Rodney Cotteril: The Enchanted Loom, Cambridge University Press
Rodney Cotteril: The Enchanted Loom, Cambridge University Press Photo: Used by kind permission of Cambridge University Press
Lead

Lectures on the neurobiology of hatred, pleasure and pain in the brain, fear and hatred, violent computer games and hatred, intergroup reconciliation and on growing up amidst intractable conflicts.

A hybrid symposium with a limited number of participants in the lecture hall and with live streaming.

Content

Programme
Download the programme here (pdf)


Live streaming

Everyone can watch this symposium online on the link below free of charge, no registration required

Live streaming from Nobel forum on this link (active on 24th September)

 

Registration
A limited number of places at Nobel Forum are available on a first come first served basis

Register for the symposium at Nobel Forum here

 

Organization
The Cultural Council of the Karolinska Institutet and Acta Paediatrica

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
Cultural Brain lecture: How rhythm and timing structure experience: Auditory perception, music and social interaction

04-05-2021 4:00 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
Zoom meeting. A Zoom link will be posted on this website a few days before the event
Lead

Speaker: Professor Laurel Trainor, McMaster University
Host: Fredrik Ullén

Content

Biography
Laurel Trainor is a Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour at McMaster University, a Research Scientist at the Rotman Research Institute, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, and a Distinguished University Professor. She directs the Auditory Development Lab

and has published over 160 articles in journals including Science and Nature on the neuroscience of auditory development and the perception of music, including work on pitch, tonality, timing, rhythm, neuroplasticity, and the role of music in social interaction and developmental disorders. She co-holds a patent for the Neuro-compensator hearing aid. She is the founding and present director of the LIVELab, a unique research-concert hall with high acoustic control, that is equipped with multi-person motion capture and EEG for studying music performance and human interaction. Laurel also has a Bachelor of Music Performance from the University of Toronto and is currently principal flute of the Burlington Symphony.

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
What is life? Why is there cancer? And why cancer treatment often backfires..

11-05-2021 3:00 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
Zoom meeting (see link below)
Lead

Speaker: Sui Huang, ISB, Seattle
Host: Ingemar Ernberg

Content

Zoom meeting information

Meeting ID: 611 3454 1156
Passcode: 005138

Click here to access the meeting online

 

Sui Huang, MD, PhD, obtained his doctorates in medicine and molecular biology at the University of Zurich in 1995 working on interferons.  After postdoctoral training in cancer biology, he became faculty at Harvard Medical School in Boston, where he studied cell fate decisions. At the University of Calgary he worked alongside Stuart Kauffman on gene regulatory networks and cancer differentiation therapy (=exiting the cancer attractor), before joining the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle in 2011. Sui Huang demonstrated that cell types are attractor states in high-dimensional gene expression space and uncovered that cell state instability precedes cell fate decisions. His current laboratory at ISB combines single-cell omics technologies and theory of non-linear dynamical systems to better the fundamental inevitability of tumor progression.

Abstract
Cancer appears to be universal in complex living organisms.  Therefore, it may be a necessary manifestation of their robustness – which is epitomized by regenerative capacity. In this talk I will review the theory of gene regulayory networks, concepts of the cell attractor, multistability, and the “rugged epigenetic landscape”, as well as the evolution of regeneration -- leading to stress-indcued stemness. From this follows that cytotoxic stress imparted by treatment itself will either kill the cancer cell or induce stemness, thereby planting the seed for recurrence.  Thus, tumors exhibit Nietzsche’s principle of “What does not kill me makes me stronger” – perhaps a manifestation of instability and (non-genetic) bifurcation dynamics. I will demonstrate the practical consequences for treatment (which is poised to “backfire”) – supported by the latest single-cell transcriptomics data.

 

 

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
What is life? Microbiota-centered interventions in oncology : rationale and principles

29-03-2021 1:00 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
Microsoft Teams meeting (see link below)
Lead

Speaker: Laurence Zitvogel, Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris
Host: Ingemar Ernberg

Content

Microsoft Teams information

Microsoft teams is a free meeting application that can be downloaded in the App Store or Google Play on your smartphone

Click here to access the meeting in Microsoft teams

 

Laurence Zitvogel Biography
Laurence Zitvogel is an expert in the field of cancer immunology and immunotherapy. She brought together basic and translational research, including the design of cancer therapies through combined animal studies and Phase I/II patient trials. Her expertise is mainly dendritic cell and innate effector biology and relevance during tumour development as well as exosome-based vaccine designs. She pioneered the concept of immunogenic cell death and showed that chemotherapy, radiotherapy and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase mediate their tumoricidal activity, at least partly through the immune system. Her team recently discovered the critical role and impact of gut microbiota in cancer immunosurveillance and therapies.

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
Cultural Brain lecture: Beyond the limit of sensorimotor skills of musicians

15-04-2021 11:00 am Add to iCal
Online
Location
Zoom meeting (see link below)
Lead

Speaker: Professor Shinichi Furuya, Sony Computer Science Laboratories and Sophia University

Host: Fredrik Ullén

Content

Zoom information

This lecture will take place online, and a Zoom link will be published on the website just before the lecture

Zoom information here

 

Bibliography

Shinichi Furuya is a researcher and program manager at Sony Computer Science Laboratories, research associate professor at Sophia University, and a guest professor at Hannover University of Music, Drama and Media. After studying mechanical engineering, biomechanics, and motor neuroscience at Osaka University in Japan, he worked at University of Minnesota (USA), Hannover University of Music, Drama and Media (Germany), and Sophia University (Japan). He received the Postdoctoral Fellowship at Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Heisenberg Fellowship  at German Research Foundation (DFG), and Susanne Klein-Vogelbach-Prize for the Research of Human Movement. His research goal is to support for musicians to overcome the limit of musical expertise and to prevent injuries through musical practicing. Toward the goal, he has studied neuroplastic and biomechanical mechanisms subserving acquisition, sophistication, loss, and restoration of sensorimotor skills in musical performance. He is also an organizer of the piano academy program hosted by Sony CSL, at which he provides physical education and technological support for young talented pianists.
 

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
What is life? & The future of biology: The Emergence of Life in the Universe

03-03-2021 4:00 pm Add to iCal
Location
Zoom meeting (see link below)
Lead

Speaker: Stuart Kauffman, ISB, Seattle, & University of Pennsylvania
Host: Ingemar Ernberg

Content

Zoom meeting details

Time: Mar 3, 2021 04:00 PM Stockholm

https://ki-se.zoom.us/j/65815212194?pwd=QWMzZVAwcEtRTEg0TWdoWi9nUTk5UT09

Meeting ID: 658 1521 2194
Passcode: 009032

Or dial  +46 8 5050 0828 Sweden, +46 8 5050 0829 Sweden

 

Biography
Stuart Kauffman is a medical doctor, theoretical biologist, and complex systems researcher who studies the origin of life on Earth. He is emeritus professor of biochemistry at the University of Pennsylvania and affiliated to the Institute for Systems Biology, Seatle. He is arguing that the complexity of biological systems and organisms might result as much from self-organization and far-from-equilibrium dynamics as from Darwinian natural selection, as discussed in his book Origins of Order (1993). He used random boolean networks to investigate generic self-organizing properties of gene regulatory networks, proposing that cell types are dynamical attractors in gene regulatory networks. He proposed the self-organized emergence of collectively autocatalytic sets of polymers for the origin of molecular reproduction. More recent book titles are(2008). Reinventing the Sacred: A New View of Science, Reason, and Religion, 2008, Humanity in a Creative Universe, 2016 and  A World Beyond Physics, 2019.

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
What is life? Is life Quantum Mechanical?

14-04-2021 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
Zoom meeting (see link below)
Lead

Speaker: Jim Al-Khalili, UK
Host: Ingemar Ernberg

Content

Zoom meeting details

Zoom link for the meeting

Meeting ID: 669 1573 6230
Passcode: 700760
Or dial
        +46 8 5052 0017 Sweden
        +46 850 539 728 Sweden

 

Abstract:
Physicists are used to dealing with quantum mechanics, but biologists have thus far got away without having to worry about this strange yet powerful theory of the subatomic world. However, times are changing. There is now solid evidence that enzymes use quantum tunnelling to accelerate chemical reactions, plants send quantum lumps of energy in many directions at once to calculate the most efficient route for sunlight to get to their photosynthetic cells. More intriguingly, it appears that some birds might use quantum entanglement – what Einstein called “spooky action at a distance” – to ‘see’ the earth’s magnetic field for navigation. This lecture introduces the exciting new field of Quantum Biology. And if life does make use of quantum mechanics, how exciting and important is this field likely to become? 

 

Short Biography:
Jim Al-Khalili OBE FRS is a theoretical physicist at the University of Surrey where he holds a Distinguished Chair in physics as well as a university chair in the public engagement in science. His main research field has been theoretical nuclear physics, though in recent years he has developed an interest in the new interdisciplinary area of quantum biology. He is also a well-known populariser of science having written 14 books, between them translated into twenty-six languages. He is also a regular presenter of TV science documentaries and hosts the long-running weekly BBC Radio 4 programme, The Life Scientific. His website: jimal-khalili.com 

Contact

Event type
Lectures and seminars
What is life? P4 medicine and the future health care

31-03-2021 3:00 pm Add to iCal
Online
Location
Zoom meeting. See details below
Lead

Speaker: Lee Hood, Institute of Systems Biology (ISB), Seattle
Host: Ingemar Ernberg

Content

Zoom information

https://ki-se.zoom.us/j/63949329836?pwd=aE1XdytpTGhEZWlZUzBPMVFMdmk2dz09

Meeting ID: 639 4932 9836

Passcode: 105194    

 

Biography
Leroy "Lee" Edward Hood established the first cross-disciplinary biology department, the Department of Molecular Biotechnology (MBT), at the University of Washington in 1992, and co-founded the Institute for Systems Biology in 2000. Hood is credited with introducing the term "systems biology",and advocates for "P4 medicine", medicine that is "predictive, personalized, preventive, and participatory. Scientific American counted him among the 10 most influential people in the field of biotechnology in 2015.

Hood has developed ground-breaking scientific instruments which made possible major advances in the biological sciences and the medical sciences. His  protein sequencer, DNA synthesizer, peptide synthesizer, and DNA sequencer were commercialized through Applied Biosystems, Inc. and the ink-jet technology was commercialized through Agilent Technologies. The automated DNA sequencer was an enabling technology for the Human Genome Project. The peptide synthesizer was used in the synthesis of the HIV protease by Stephen Kent and others, and the development of a protease inhibitor for AIDS treatment.

 

Abstract
21st century medicine is undergoing a revolution that argues healthcare should be predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) and acknowledges it has two major domains—wellness and disease.  The effective implementation of P4 healthcare arises from the idea that the complexity of human biology and the complexity  of disease can only be assessed in each individual with genomic and deep phenotypic analyses (e.g., blood analytes, gut microbiome, digital health measurements, etc).  Thus 21st century medicine is about following longitudinally the health trajectory of each individual and optimizing wellness and detecting and avoiding transitions to disease.  I will report on the analyses of longitudinal deep phenotyping data from about 5000 well individuals from Arivale—a company bringing quantitative or scientific wellness to consumers that closed down about 9 months ago.  I will also talk about a new proposal that we are just initiating to implement genomic and deep phenotyping analyses on 1-million  patients (the million person project) at Providence St. Joseph Health (PSJH), the 3rd largest healthcare non-profit institute over a 5 year period—this project will be the catalyst for achieving 21st century medicine and will bring this new approach to approximately 10% of the  PSJH patients. It offers unique possibilities for improving clinical service, the possibility to discover thousands of new actionable possibilities, each  of which can improve health,  from the integration of genomic and phenomic data, the possibility of creating a myriad of new companies (e.g., new data generation assays, AI for managing for  physicians the  thousands of actionable possibilities, novel computational platforms for integration and analyses, etc.).  It will be the ultimate manifestation of scientific (or quantitative) wellness.  It turns out that 21st century medicine will give us powerful new approaches to solving contemporary medicine’s four largest challenges:  improving quality of health care, reducing its costs, leading us to age in a healthy manner (to deal with the large aging population), and provide us with an approach to ending most chronic disease by early prediction  and prevention.  I will discuss all of these issues and more. 

 

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